On the changing of words for the vision of others

Posted: 31 January 2013 in entertainment, HI! Magazine, life, television
Tags: ,

When writing for the vision of others it’s interesting to see how one’s work is edited. So far in writing for HI! Magazine I’ve not had to scream “no fair” when it comes to the tweaking of my words. I recently submitted a few words about the classic TV series The Prisoner for HI! Recommends: The Best Film and TV Show Marathons. Below is my original text is laid out in comparison with the edited text in italics. Not too much has been changed 🙂

The Prisoner

From September 1967 to February 1968 a masterpiece of television was transmitted as The Prisoner explored themes such as experimental drug use, rejection of authority, and the right of an individual to be an individual. There’s been nothing like it before or since: a television series that makes you think in tandem with enjoyment. The premise is simple but the application amongst the most challenging ever.

From September 1967 to February 1968, a masterpiece of television was transmitted. The Prisoner explored themes such as experimental drug use, rejection of authority, and the right of an individual to be an individual. There’s been nothing like it before or since: a television series that makes you think in tandem with enjoyment.

After abruptly resigning, a nameless British secret agent (Patrick McGoohan) is abducted and whisked away to a surreal coastal resort known only as The Village (exteriors provided by the tourist village of Portmeirion in North Wales). Dubbed Number 6 by his captors McGoohan’s character spends the series trying to learn who (or what) placed him in The Village whilst also attempting to escape. In turn The Village authorities, headed by Number 2 (portrayed by a series of guest stars), attempt to find out why Number 6 resigned so suddenly.

After abruptly resigning, a nameless British secret agent (Patrick McGoohan) is abducted and whisked away to a surreal coastal resort known only as The Village (Portmeirion in North Wales). Dubbed Number 6 by his captors McGoohan’s character spends the series trying to learn who (or what) placed him in The Village whilst also attempting to escape. In turn, The Village authorities, headed by Number 2 (portrayed by a series of guest stars), attempt to find out why Number 6 resigned so suddenly.

At the centre of the series is a powerhouse performance by Patrick McGoohan quite unlike any other you’ll have ever seen on the small screen. Also a producer, writer and director on the series, McGoohan nearly drove himself (and many of the production team) into nervous breakdowns in his vision for perfection. If you’re a fan of The Beatles think of the experimentation of Revolver, mixed with the psychedelia of Sgt Pepper, and sprinkled with the fragmented chaos of The White Album.

At the centre of the series is a powerhouse performance by Patrick McGoohan quite unlike any other you’ll have ever seen on the small screen. Also a producer, writer and director on the series, McGoohan nearly gave himself (and many of the production team) a nervous breakdown in pursuit of his vision.

Get the DVD or Blu-ray, immerse yourself in 17 gloriously colourful episodes and be amazed at how many of the series’ themes remain relevant today. Be seeing you.

Immerse yourself in 17 gloriously colourful episodes and be amazed at how many of the series’ themes remain relevant today.

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