Posts Tagged ‘cybermen’

Death in Heaven falls upon the Earth as the dead rise from their graves and the Doctor battles to save humanity from the machinations of his oldest enemy.

Oh, don’t be so slow, it’s embarrassing. Who could fool you, like this? Who could hide right under your nose? Who could change their face any time they want? Hmm. You see, I’m not Clara Oswald. Clara Oswald has never existed.

By the conclusion of Death in Heaven two things are abundantly clear. Firstly, Peter Capaldi’s a magnificent Doctor, quite possibly the best NuWho incarnation. Secondly, it’s way past time for Steven Moffat to relinquish his stewardship of the series. Series 8’s finale is one of the most nonsensically disjointed stories ever delivered under the banner of Doctor Who. It’s stuffed fuller than a Christmas turkey with Moffat’s increasing desire to produce illogical shock revelations. The writer’s fallen in love with his own supposed cleverness and sacrificed all attempts to produce a coherent narrative flow.

Doctor Who - S8 E12 Death in Heaven

Clara’s claim to be the Doctor (accompanied by Jenna Coleman’s name coming first in the opening credits and her eyes appearing in place of Peter Capaldi’s) is Moffat’s most ludicrous, idiotic and plain stupid supposed shock revelation to date. Emerging from nowhere with zero buildup it’s sole intention seems aimed at getting fans trending Doctor Who on social media as their fervour ignites. Everything’s then shot down as logic kicks in. Come on, all the bloody Cybermen had to do was scan Clara to realise that she’s not a Time Lord. She may have been a pseudo-Doctor in Flatline but it’s patently obvious that she’s not a future or alternate version of the genuine article. (more…)

The nature of death itself provides the backdrop for the return of two old adversaries as Steven Moffat’s Dark Water plunges Doctor Who into contentious territory with its risqué adult-orientated themes.

Danny, I’ll never say those words again. Not to anybody else, ever. Those words, from me, are yours now.

It’s nigh on impossible to comprehend that Dark Water stems from the same creative mind as the writer who kicked off Peter Capaldi’s time as the Twelfth Doctor with the atmospheric brilliance of Deep Breath. After being excised for the first 10 episodes of Series 8, all that’s been bad about Steven Moffat’s oversight of Doctor Who makes an unwelcome comeback. As was the case with The Day of the Doctor and The Time of the Doctor, stupidity is rife. Ludicrous character development, inappropriate sexual innuendo, supposed jaw dropping shock revelations that fail to stand up to sober followup consideration.

Doctor Who - S8 E11 Dark Water

If Amy (Karen Gillan) had threatened to destroy all the TARDIS keys in order to blackmail the Eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith) into bringing Rory (Arthur Darvill) back from the dead, the shock to the audience would have been profound. Not so much the shock of Rory being dead (that tended to happen a lot) but more that Amy was prepared to betray her beloved Raggedy Man. Gillan and Darvill had fantastic characters and genuine chemistry in that respect, even when the writing got ropier towards the end of their tenure.

Clara (Jenna Coleman) throwing away everything she’s built with the Eleventh and Twelfth Doctors for the sake of the sopping wet blanket that’s Danny Pink (Samuel Anderson) is patently ridiculous. Since his introduction in Into the Dalek this ex-soldier turned maths teacher has remained utterly devoid of an interesting personality, despite emotional chains wrapped tight around him. The intimation that Danny killed a child during his military service in Afghanistan receives confirmation in Dark Water. And it leaves an unsavoury aftertaste as Doctor Who is dragged into the real world in an unpleasant fashion. Granted the bullet-ridden corpse of the Afghan child Danny shoots in the fog of war isn’t shown but the implication is there and the results too easily imagined. The realistic representation of warfare isn’t appropriate for Doctor Who. Imagine a Patrick Troughton story featuring a massacre during the Vietnam war or a Tom Baker story revolving around the Troubles in Northern Ireland. (more…)

The official full length trailer for Series 8 of the revived Doctor Who has been released by the BBC. And for me there’s no excitement at all being generated for Peter Capaldi’s first adventures as the Twelfth Doctor. This is not good. Not good at all…

I’m the Doctor. I’ve lived for over 2000 years. I’ve made many mistakes. And it’s about time that I did something about that.

The TARDIS console continues to explode as it did in the teaser trailers. There’s dinosaurs outside the Houses of Parliament (to add to the dinosaurs inside?); Dalek saucers blasting away; robot knights; and the Doctor riding a horse in a Victorian nightshirt.

(The Doctor is wearing the nightshirt, not the horse.)

The Doctor’s declaration that he and Clara are about to go “into darkness” doesn’t bode well given how dire the Star Trek descent Into Darkness went… There’s a definite fixation on the darkness of the Doctor’s character – as there has been for every episode of 21st century Doctor Who.

Launching on Good Friday 2014 (18 April) with the very first story An Unearthly Child the Horror Channel will start transmitting a special season of classic Doctor Who stories from the era of the first seven Doctors.

ClassicWhoOnHorror

Other adventures to be shown include The Mind Robber, Terror of the Autons, The Brain of Morbius, The Caves of Androzani, Attack of the Cybermen and Remembrance of the Daleks.

To accompany the season the Horror Channel has released a brilliant animated trailer complete with narration from Tom Baker, the Fourth Doctor himself.

Continuing a theme of titles ending “of the Doctor” (Name, Night, Day) it’s been announced that the final adventure of Matt Smith’s Eleventh Doctor will be The Time of the Doctor.

The official synopsis runs:
“Orbiting a quiet backwater planet, the massed forces of the universe’s deadliest species gather, drawn to a mysterious message that echoes out to the stars. And amongst them – the Doctor. Rescuing Clara from a family Christmas dinner, the Time Lord and his best friend must learn what this enigmatic signal means for his own fate and that of the universe.” (more…)

Multi-award winning author Neil Gaiman returns to the universe of Doctor Who on a partially successful mission to make the Cybermen scary again with a Nightmare in Silver.

Doctor Who - Nightmare in Silver

Neil Gaiman’s previous contribution to Doctor Who was The Doctor’s Wife, which garnered widespread acclaim for its inventive plot, oddball characters and grungy setting. Unfortunately his follow-up of Nightmare in Silver was a far different and poorer affair. Granted the special effects were more than up to par with rampaging hoards of Cybermen, an entire amusement world depicted and an ever-fluctuating environment representing the interior of the Doctor’s mind, but the script continually felt as though it needed two or three more drafts to draw together disparate concepts, fill in the plot and generate rounded characters.

Inspired by fears of increasing spare part surgery potentially robbing people of their humanity, the Cybermen first appeared in William Hartnell’s final story The Tenth Planet and came to prominence during four adventures in the Patrick Troughton era. Traditionally the second most popular monster in Doctor Who that accolade has been passed onto the Weeping Angels in recent years.

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All indications are that Doctor Who will be returning for the final 6 episodes of this series on Saturday 27 August. Treats in store include: Hitler, Cybermen, Weeping Angels, and River Song!!!

Plus Karen Gillan is confirmed to be appearing alongside Matt Smith in Series 7, though no word on the actual number of episodes that she’ll be in.