Posts Tagged ‘peter davison’

For 15 years Big Finish Productions have been producing inventive, entertaining and award-winning officially licensed Doctor Who audio adventures. In over 400 stories the universe of the Doctor has been expanded by a talented family of actors, writers, directors, sound designers, and many other behind-the-scenes geniuses. And the lunches are legendary…

Happy 15th birthday Big Finish

The first that the world knew of this new chapter in the Doctor’s adventures in space and time came with an announcement in the Gallifrey Guardian news column in issue 275 of Doctor Who Magazine, dated 10 March 1999:

WORLD EXCLUSIVE! Doctors unite for “canonical” drama. BBC approves new Doctor Who audio plays. 
Big Finish Productions, the company behind the recent audio dramatisations of the Bernice Summerfield New Adventures novels, has secured a ground-breaking licence to produce all-new, full-length Doctor Who dramas.

Released in July 1999 Big Finish’s first Doctor Who adventure was The Sirens of Time, written and directed by Nicholas Briggs (now the voice of the Daleks in the revived TV series). Uniting three of the original actors who played the Doctor: Peter Davison (Fifth Doctor), Colin Baker (Sixth Doctor) and Sylvester McCoy (Seventh Doctor), the play was an immediate success and paved the way for Big Finish to redefine the possibilities offered by the Doctor Who universe.

Paul McGann’s Eighth Doctor joined the fold in January 2001 in Storm Warning and, after many years of reticence, Tom Baker finally reprised his role as the iconic Fourth Doctor, commencing in January 2012 with Destination: Nerva and The Fourth Doctor Box Set. All five of the living 20th century classic Doctors subsequently came together in 2013 for The Light at the End, a special audio event to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Doctor Who. (more…)

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Launching on Good Friday 2014 (18 April) with the very first story An Unearthly Child the Horror Channel will start transmitting a special season of classic Doctor Who stories from the era of the first seven Doctors.

ClassicWhoOnHorror

Other adventures to be shown include The Mind Robber, Terror of the Autons, The Brain of Morbius, The Caves of Androzani, Attack of the Cybermen and Remembrance of the Daleks.

To accompany the season the Horror Channel has released a brilliant animated trailer complete with narration from Tom Baker, the Fourth Doctor himself.

The Time of the Doctor is an unmitigated mess. An incoherent, continuity-laden, Universal Monsters-style mashup. Underdeveloped characters populate a sparse narrative that acts as a fragile and mediocre framework for massive info dumps. It’s all undercoat and no gloss. A more apt title would be The-Time-of-Explaining-Everything-That’s-Been-Left-Unexplained-Over-The-Last-Four-Years.

The Time of the Doctor - credits landscape light

The entire enterprise pans out as precisely the kind of continuity-orientated crappily-written, poorly-characterised rubbish that caused Doctor Who to be cancelled in the 1980s. It’s The Trial of a Time Lord meets Attack of the Cybermen with a detour into Time and the Rani. On acid. It also completes the neutering of the Weeping Angels as a threat. Stick mirrors in front of them and all’s well. Reflecting (sorry) that old adage that evil can’t face itself (as with the Mara in Kinda). Makes one wonder if Steven Moffat is able to face himself anymore…

I’m the Doctor. I’m a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey. I stole a time machine and ran away, and I’ve been flouting the principle law of my own people ever since!

There’s no denying Moffat’s scope and ambition for Matt Smith’s finale as the Eleventh Doctor. A summation of four years of adventures. A tying up of loose ends. Gathering together plot threads left hanging since The Eleventh Hour in April 2010. A fitting last hurrah whilst establishing the foundations for a new era. Unfortunately it crashes and burns in a rushed apocalyptic fury. There’s a huge sense of Moffat sitting at his computer typing furiously and thinking, “Oh shit, I’ve not explained that bit from The Eleventh Hour, or that bit from The Big Bang, or that bit from The Wedding of River Song”. Viewers are expected to possess fantastic levels of recall relating to all the plot elements that have gone before as Moffat unleashes his mighty convoluted saga.

Hang on tight, here we go…

(more…)

Well Steven Moffat. We loyal and trusting Doctor Who fans patiently saved the day. We spread the much publicised hashtag #SaveTheDay across social media, and throughout space and time. We were delighted when Doctor Who took over television as promised in the run up to the anniversary itself. And what did we get on 23 November 2013 as a reward for our patience, anticipation and adulation? The Day of the Doctor. The special adventure to celebrate 50 years of Doctor Who. One of the worst episodes ever.

I’ve been running all my lives… through time and space. Every second of every minute of every day for over nine hundred years. I fought for peace in a universe at war. Now the time has come to face the choices I made in the name of the Doctor. Our future depends on one single moment of one impossible day. The day I’ve been running from all my life. The day of the Doctor.

The Day of the Doctor - 12 incarnations

Earning a Guinness World Record for the world’s largest ever simulcast of a TV drama The Day of the Doctor was broadcast by the BBC simultaneously in 94 countries and six continents. It was also shown in 3D in 1500 cinemas where fans dressed up and created huge levels of excitement akin to conventions. An unparalleled global event to celebrate 50 years of the Doctor’s seemingly eternal adventure in space and time.

Just one fundamental flaw with The Day of the Doctor

The Day of the Doctor is bad. The Day of the Doctor is really bad. The Day of the Doctor is really really really bad. It lurks in the depths of all-time hideous Doctor Who clunkers alongside Time-Flight, Timelash, Time and the Rani, and Love & Monsters. (more…)

Doctor Who: The Light at the End

The 50th anniversary audio adventure from Big Finish starring Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy and Paul McGann.

The light is getting brighter

For the 50th Anniversary of Doctor Who Big Finish will be releasing The Light at the End, a 100 minute celebratory tale featuring all five surviving Doctors from the original 20th century era of the television series

November 23rd 1963 proves to be a significant day in the lives of all eight Doctors…

It’s the day that Bob Dovie’s life is ripped apart…

It’s also a day that sets in motion a catastrophic chain of events which forces the first eight incarnations of the Doctor to fight for their very existence. As a mysterious, insidious chaos unfolds within the TARDIS, the barriers of time break apart…

From suburban England through war-torn alien landscapes and into a deadly, artificial dimension, all these Doctors and their companions must struggle against the power of an unfathomable, alien technology.

From the very beginning, it is clear that the Master is somehow involved. By the end, for the Doctors, there may only be darkness.

Written By: Nicholas Briggs
Directed By: Nicholas Briggs

Cast

Tom Baker, Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy, Paul McGann (The Doctor), Louise Jameson (Leela), Sarah Sutton (Nyssa), Nicola Bryant (Peri), Sophie Aldred (Ace), India Fisher (Charley Pollard), Geoffrey Beevers (The Master) with special guest stars!

The Light at the End

A year long celebration of Doctor Who at BFI Southbank. Includes a special preview of Mark Gatiss’ new TV drama An Adventure in Time and Space and a newly colour restored screening of The Mind of Evil, starring Jon Pertwee. More info here.

BFI Doctor Who 50th anniversary

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Doctor Who The 11 Doctors